The Road Ahead for NGINX in Ubuntu

 nginx, NGINX, Server Packages, Ubuntu  Comments Off on The Road Ahead for NGINX in Ubuntu
Jul 112016
 

Hello, everyone! Two blog posts and a flurry of tweets in a day, what the heck has gotten into me?

Some fun things have happened in the last development cycle leading up to Xenial for nginx! Let’s recap a couple of the big things that’re ‘great’ happenings:

  • NGINX 1.9.x was accepted into Xenial during the development process.
  • Later in the dev cycle, we were given the ACK by the Security Team to enable the HTTP/2 module (yay, HTTP/2 support!)
  • Close to the end, that was also updated to 1.10.x post-release to get us onto a Stable version for the duration of the LTS! Yay, an LTS with a Stable version!

All in all, a good dev cycle for getting NGINX into the Ubuntu repositories! Now, we look ahead to the future.


First, a note about Wily. The NGINX PPAs will no longer get any Wily updates, as of today. This close to the End of Life date of Wily, I can’t guarantee there’ll be any updates beyond security-critical ones prompting such updates, given the EOL date of Wily being in a couple weeks.

This means, for the most part, that bugs which are against the Wily package in Ubuntu also get less scrutiny as we focus on the future. Any such Wily-filed bugs will need to be confirmed in another release of an equal or newer version (basically, Xenial or later) before I poke at them or another person pokes at them (this doesn’t prevent the community from submitting patches though). This also means people on Wily boxes who want to get continued NGINX support should upgrade to Xenial because I can’t guarantee they’ll get updates as they wish. And once Wily goes EOL, they get nothing.


Secondly, the road ahead. Up in Debian, they’re starting to test builds against the next OpenSSL version (1.1.0). Unfortunately, NGINX Stable 1.10.x doesn’t build. After poking upstream, I’ve learned there is a fix for this… but for NGINX Mainline… and it won’t be backported to 1.10.x. This is a little bit of a headache, for a couple reasons.

  1. NGINX Stable 1.10.x is not going to be able to be supported at some point in the future in Ubuntu, because it won’t have OpenSSL support.
  2. To get NGINX Mainline as the version in NGINX, I need to merge in the quite-evil Debian ‘dynamic modules’ support.
  3. Further, to get NGINX Mainline into Ubuntu during a development cycle, I need to go and pull in from Debian Experimental, and then build test against the older OpenSSL to make sure nothing dies off.

The big issues of this are mostly that we don’t know the full timeline of OpenSSL 1.1.0 being released in Debian. I have assurances from the Ubuntu Security Team, however, that OpenSSL 1.1.0 will not be included until packages don’t Fail to Build from Source (FTBFS) against it. Which means that I don’t have to act on this immediately.

The additional headache added to this list though is that, while I merge in Dynamic Module Support, it is not 100% ‘supported’ yet in Debian, and it won’t be totally supported in a sane way for packages which ship third-party modules. There has been discussion threads on some third-party modules packaging their modules to work as a dynamic module for Ubuntu Universe / Debian. This is a double-edged sword. Not only do I have to worry about NGINX updates, but I will have to start making sure all the dynamic modules get rebuilt for each upload. I’ll be working to try and find a better solution to this, but this will preclude updates to things getting done at times, given the signature-based approach to dynamic modules that exists currently. We’ll work through this, though, at some point, and make it more supportable in the future.

——

Just wanted to give you all some insights into the future of NGINX, and the headaches I will have to work through, for Ubuntu’s packages going forward.

NGINX Mainline PPA: 1.11.2 is being built and released; Ubuntu Wily EOL: No new NGINX versions in PPAs for Wily.

 NGINX, NGINX Mainline PPA, NGINX PPA, NGINX Stable PPA, Ubuntu  Comments Off on NGINX Mainline PPA: 1.11.2 is being built and released; Ubuntu Wily EOL: No new NGINX versions in PPAs for Wily.
Jul 112016
 

Been a while since I posted about NGINX on my blog.

Anyways, good news. NGINX 1.11.2 has been uploaded to the staging PPA, and is in the process of being built. If there’s no issues with the builds, then I’ll push the packages to the main Mainline PPA when they’re completed.

NGINX 1.11.2 includes a few new features, but also a bunch of bugfixes:

Changes with nginx 1.11.2                                        05 Jul 2016

    *) Change: now nginx always uses internal MD5 and SHA1 implementations;
       the --with-md5 and --with-sha1 configure options were canceled.

    *) Feature: variables support in the stream module.

    *) Feature: the ngx_stream_map_module.

    *) Feature: the ngx_stream_return_module.

    *) Feature: a port can be specified in the "proxy_bind", "fastcgi_bind",
       "memcached_bind", "scgi_bind", and "uwsgi_bind" directives.

    *) Feature: now nginx uses the IP_BIND_ADDRESS_NO_PORT socket option
       when available.

    *) Bugfix: a segmentation fault might occur in a worker process when
       using HTTP/2 and the "proxy_request_buffering" directive.

    *) Bugfix: the "Content-Length" request header line was always added to
       requests passed to backends, including requests without body, when
       using HTTP/2.

    *) Bugfix: "http request count is zero" alerts might appear in logs when
       using HTTP/2.

    *) Bugfix: unnecessary buffering might occur when using the "sub_filter"
       directive; the issue had appeared in 1.9.4.

All in all this is a good thing.

However, for Ubuntu Wily 15.10 server users, who use the Mainline PPA, this is the last update for the Mainline PPA for Ubuntu Wily. Ubuntu Wily goes End of Life on July 28, 2016. This means it will no longer be supported by Ubuntu upstream, and will receive no new security updates, bug fix updates, etc. on that date. With the EOL date being so close, this is the last upload to the Mainline PPA for Ubuntu Wily. (This also holds true for the Stable PPA – there will be no new Wily updates except for security updates that may happen between now and July 28th)

planet.ubuntu-wisconsin.org downtime – May 03, 2016

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on planet.ubuntu-wisconsin.org downtime – May 03, 2016
May 012016
 

planet.ubuntu-wisconsin.org may have temporary downtime on May 3rd, 2016 for system updates on the underlying server.

Downtime is not a guarantee, but should downtime occur, it is not predicted to be down for more than 30 minutes.

If you have any questions about this downtime, please contact Thomas Ward with those questions.

Ubuntu Server 16.04 on RamNode KVM VPSes: A How-To Guide Using the ISOs

 RamNode, RamNode KVM VPS, Ubuntu  Comments Off on Ubuntu Server 16.04 on RamNode KVM VPSes: A How-To Guide Using the ISOs
Apr 262016
 

This is a guide to make RamNode KVM VPSes run Ubuntu 16.04 Server, by manually setting it up via the Ubuntu Server 16.04 ISO.

  1. PREREQUISITES:
    • A new RamNode KVM VPS (or one you don’t mind losing all the data on).
    • Knowledge of Linux
    • Access to VPSCP (Solus)
  2. Start by setting up the VPS with a pre-made image (14.04 Minimal works).
  3. Login to the VPS, get the /etc/network/interfaces information and store it in a different file not on the server, for a reference of settings. We will re-implement this later, or rather, we’ll be using this later if the configuration fails, or to know what data needs to be provided for the system to work.
  4. Login to VPSCP.
  5. Go to your VPS settings, open the settings for your VM, and under the CDRom tab select the “Ubuntu 16.04 Server x86_64” item, and hit “Mount”.
  6. Under the “Settings” tab on the VPSCP for the VM, make sure Boot Order is set to “(1) CDROM (2) Hard Disk”
  7. Either use VPSCP to shut down the VPS, or login via SSH and then shut down the VPS.
  8. Click “Boot”. The VPS will now boot, and boot from the CDROM image.
  9. In the VPSCP, click the “VNC” button for your VPS. You can use the HTML5 VNC client or use an actual VNC client to connect to the connection information available on the VNC Viewer page.
  10. Once VNC is up, select your language from the CDROM prompt, then select “Install Ubuntu” on the screen that remains.
  11. Follow the screen prompts, providing the relevant information requested by the system. When it gets to the option for partitioning, and says “reuse partitions” or “Erase disk”, select the “Erase Disk” option that says to use LVM.
  12. Go through the rest of the prompts, and select the software features you want to install. Once it’s installed, the VPS will reboot. Close the VNC connection.
  13. Go back to VPSCP, and click “Shutdown” on the VPS control panel. The VPS will not boot when you select “Boot from first hard disk” from the CDROM menu.
  14. Under “Settings”, change your “Boot Order” to “(1) Hard Disk (2) CDROM” or to “Hard disk only”.
  15. Before we start the VPS, we need to reconfigure the networking – this will install the Solus network configuration to get the networking up and working. Note that this configuration will need to be edited.
  16. Once the “Reconfigure Networking” step is completed, and your VPS boots, connect once again to the VNC. Login to the server, using the credentials you set up during the installation steps via the ISO. Note that this VPS will not have working networking at this step – you must UPDATE the configuration to adapt for the Predictable Network Interface Naming, which Solus does not yet support in its network auto-configuration
  17. Run the following command, and take a note as to what network interface name(s) come up other than lo (it may show up as ens3 or similar):
    ifconfig -a
  18. We now need to edit /etc/network/interfaces. Wherever eth0 shows up in the interfaces file, replace it with the interface name you gathered from step 16.
  19. Once your VPS reboots, we have to test its connectivity to the Internet.
    1. If you selected “OpenSSH server” or “SSH Server” during the installation steps, then you can attempt to directly SSH to your server, specifying the user you configured, and the IP address, for the connection details.
    2. If you did not select to install an SSH server, then connect to the server via the VNC, and login with the credentials you specified during installation.
  20. Once on the server, make sure you get ping replies for both of these commands.
    ping 8.8.8.8
    ping6 2001:4860:4860::8888
  21. If you received ping replies from the above commands, you have successfully redone the network configuration on the server, and everything is all ready for you to begin using your Ubuntu 16.04 VPS on RamNode! If not, verify the network settings put in place by Solus match the network settings you should be using.
Apr 122016
 

Hello again! NGINX 1.9.14 is now available in Ubuntu Xenial. There’s quite a few things we should make known to everyone who uses nginx in Ubuntu, with php5-fpm currently!


HTTP/2 is now enabled

Yes, HTTP/2 is now enabled for nginx-core, nginx-full, and nginx-extras in Ubuntu Xenial. Add http2 to your SSL listener line in your server blocks, and HTTP/2 will be enabled for that port and site.

For HTTP/2 on non-Xenial Ubuntu releases, you can use the Mainline PPA for Wily and later. Anything before Wily does not have full HTTP/2 support, and very likely will not be usable to get HTTP/2 working as intended.


Ubuntu Xenial ships php7.0-fpm, and not php5-fpm, and this will break existing site configurations

The Ubuntu Xenial packages for nginx have already been updated for this change, pointing to php7.0-fpm instead of php5-fpm.

However, users who have existing site configurations will not benefit from these changes. They must manually apply the changes.

Effectively, this is what a default setup uses to interface with the default php5-fpm setup on Ubuntu versions before Xenial, passing all PHP processing to the php5-fpm backend. This is from the default configuration file, but it’s still similar for all PHP passing:

    location ~ \.php$ {
        include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
    
        # With php5-cgi alone:
        #fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
        # With php5-fpm:
        fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php5-fpm.sock;
    }

In Ubuntu Xenial, the TCP listener for php7.0-cgi will be unchanged, however for php7.0-fpm, it will be necessary to update the configuration to look like this for existing site configurations:

    location ~ \.php$ {
        include snippets/fastcgi-php.conf;
    
        # With php7.0-cgi alone:
        #fastcgi_pass 127.0.0.1:9000;
        # With php7.0-fpm:
        fastcgi_pass unix:/run/php/php7.0-fpm.sock;
    }

This will prevent HTTP 502 Bad Gateway errors, and will use the updated php7.0-fpm instead of the php5-fpm packages.

(If for some reason you still want to have php5-fpm under Xenial, you will not be able to get support from Ubuntu for this; you will need to use a PPA. I explain this on a different post on my blog.)

Ubuntu Xenial: Adding php5.6 to Xenial

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Ubuntu Xenial: Adding php5.6 to Xenial
Apr 122016
 

Ubuntu Xenial will not ship php5 at all.

The only way to get continued php5 access is to use a PPA, specifically Ondřej Surý’s PPA for co-installable php5 and php7.0. However, this is not supported by the Ubuntu Server Team or the Ubuntu Security Team, and you accept the risks therein of using PPAs for getting php5.

The packages are *not* named php5 but are instead named php5.6.

So, to add php5.6-fpm to Xenial, you would do something like this to add the PPA, update, and then also install php5.6-fpm and dependencies:

sudo apt-get install python-software-properties
sudo LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8 add-apt-repository ppa:ondrej/php
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install php5.6-fpm

(Note that I have not tested this; this is, however, supposedly usable based on user experience data gathered on Ask Ubuntu by myself.)

This should be a similar process for any of the other php5.6 packages you would need. However, you do NOT need to re-add the PPA if it’s already on your system.

planet.ubuntu-wisconsin.org now operational

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on planet.ubuntu-wisconsin.org now operational
Feb 052016
 

Thanks to a joint effort between Thomas Ward (https://launchpad.net/~teward) providing server power and disk space and Simon Quigley (https://launchpad.net/~tsimonq2) providing the drive behind the project, the Ubuntu Wisconsin LoCo Team’s Planet feed aggregation site, here, is now operational.

Please contact Simon Quigley for information about this feed aggregator (and how to get added to it), or the Ubuntu Wisconsin LoCo Team.

If there is a technical issue with this site, or if the site is not responding for some reason, please contact Thomas Ward.

NGINX PPA Cleanup

 NGINX, NGINX Mainline PPA, NGINX PPA, NGINX Stable PPA  Comments Off on NGINX PPA Cleanup
Feb 052016
 

The NGINX PPAs have had some cleanup done to them today.

Previously, the PPAs kept the ‘older’ package versions in them for now-EOL releases (this included keeping ancient versions for Maverick, Natty, Oneiric, Quantal, Raring, Saucy, and Utopic). This was decided upon in order to prevent people from seeing 404 errors on PPA checking. We also included a large list of “Final Version” items for each Ubuntu release, stating there would be no more updates for that release, but keeping the ancient packages in place for installation.

Looking back on this, this is a bad thing for multiple reasons. Firstly, it means people in ‘older releases’ can still use the PPA for that release. This means security-holed versions of NGINX could still be used. Secondly, it implies that we still ‘support’ the use of older releases of Ubuntu in the PPAs. This has the security connotation that we are OK with people using no-longer-updated releases, which in turn have their own security holes.

So, today, in an effort to discourage the use of ancient Ubuntu versions which get no security updates or support anymore, I’ve made changes to the way that the PPAs will operate going forward: Unless a release recently went End of Life, versions of the nginx package in the PPAs for older Ubuntu releases are no longer going to be kept, and will be deleted a week after the version goes End of Life.

Therefore, as of today, I have deleted all the packages in the NGINX PPAs (both Stable and Mainline, in both staging and release PPAs) for the following releases of Ubuntu:

  • Maverick (10.10)
  • Natty (11.04)
  • Oneiric (11.10)
  • Quantal (12.10)
  • Raring (13.04)
  • Saucy (13.10)
  • Utopic (15.04)

People still using ancient versions of NGINX or Ubuntu are strongly recommended to upgrade to get continued support and security/bug fixes.

Changes for NGINX Mainline 1.9.6+ Packages in PPAs

 nginx, NGINX Mainline PPA, NGINX PPA, Server Packages, Ubuntu  Comments Off on Changes for NGINX Mainline 1.9.6+ Packages in PPAs
Nov 022015
 

Good day to everyone!

This post is to announce that there are some changes being introduced in the NGINX 1.9.6 packages maintained by Thomas Ward in the Mainline PPA.

1.9.5: SPDY module removed, replaced with HTTP/2 module
The SPDY module was dropped as of nginx 1.9.5. It was replaced with the HTTP/2 module which is considered ‘experimental’. This is reflected in the packages, however 1.9.5 was ever uploaded to the PPAs due to issues in the package which made it less secure.

1.9.6: HTTP/2 bugfixes and other changes
1.9.6 introduced a bunch of bugfixes, and even more bugfixes to HTTP/2. HTTP/2 had multiple issues, but is still considered an “experimental” module. The issues resolved so far make this one OK to upload and use.

Flavor Changes
As a result of the changes to modules, there will be a few changes to the flavors shipped in the PPAs.

Firstly, the SPDY module is no longer included in either nginx-full or nginx-extras.

Secondly, the HTTP/2 module is only loaded in nginx-extras, due to its experimental nature. If you need HTTP/2 you will need to use the nginx-extras version.

Landscape and Gitlab on the same server: Headaches, and thoughts.

 GitLab, Landscape, NGINX, Ubuntu  Comments Off on Landscape and Gitlab on the same server: Headaches, and thoughts.
Aug 262015
 

This is a mini case study, or rather a report from me, on how difficult it can be to run multiple services from the same server. Especially when they listen on similar ports for different aspects. In this post, I examine the headaches of making two things work on the same server: GitLab (via their Omnibus .deb packages), and Landscape (Canonical’s systems management tool).

I am not an expert on either of the software I listed, but what I do know I will state here.

The Software

Landscape

Many of you have probably heard of Landscape, Canonical’s systems management tool for the Ubuntu operating system. Some of you probably know about how we can deploy Landscape standalone for our own personal use with 10 Virtual and 10 Physical machines managed by Landscape, via Juju, or manually.

Most of my systems/servers are Ubuntu, and I have enough that makes management by one individual a headache. In the workplace, we have an entire infrastructure set up for a specific set of applications, all on an Ubuntu base, and a similar headache in managing them all one at a time. For me, discovering Landscape Dedicated Server, the setup yourself, makes management FAR easier. Landscape has a dependency on Apache

GitLab

GitLab is almost like GitHub in a sense. It provides a web interface for working with code, via the Git Version Control System. Github and GitLab are both very useful, but for those of us wanting the same interface in only one organization, or for personal use, and not trusting the Cloud hosts like GitHub or GitLab’s cloud, we can run it via their Omnibus package, which is Gitlab pre-packaged for different distributions (Ubuntu included!)

It includes its own copy of nginx for serving content, and uses Unicorn for the Ruby components. It listens on both port 80 and 8080, initially, per the gitlab configuration file which rewrites and modifies all the other configurations for Gitlab, which includes both of those servers.

The tricky parts

But then, I ran into a dilemma on my own personal setup of it: What happens if you need Landscape and multiple other sites run from the same server, some parts with SSL, some without? Throw into the mix that I am not an Apache person, and part of the dilemma appears.

1: Port 8080.

There’s a conflict between these two softwares. Part of Landscape (I believe the appserver part) and part of GitLab (it’s Unicorn server, which handles the Ruby-to-nginx interface both try and bind to port 8080.

2: Conflicting Web Servers on Same Web Ports

Landscape relies on Apache. GitLab relies on its own-shipped nginx. Both are set by default to listen on port 80. Landscape’s Apache config also listens on HTTPS.

These configurations, out of the box by default, have a very evil problem: both try to bind to port 80, so they don’t work together on the same server.

My solution

Firstly, some information. The nginx bundled as part of GitLab is not easily configured for additional sites. It’s not very friendly to be a ‘reverse proxy’ handler. Secondly, I am not an Apache person. Sure, you may be able to get Apache to work as the ‘reverse proxy’, but it is unwieldy for me to do that, as I’m an nginx guy.

These steps also needed to be done with Landscape turned off. (That’s as easy as running sudo lsctl stop)

1: Solve the Port 8080 conflict

Given that Landscape is something by Canonical, I chose to not mess with it. Instead, we can mess with GitLab to make it bind Unicorn to a different port.

What we have to do with GitLab is tell its Unicorn to listen on a different IP/Port combination. These two lines in the default configuration file control it (the file is located at /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb in the Omnibus packages):

# unicorn['listen'] = '127.0.0.1'
# unicorn['port'] = 8080

These are commented out by default. The default binding is to bind to 127.0.0.1:8080. We can easily change GitLab’s configurations though, by editing the file, and uncommenting both lines. We have to uncomment both because otherwise it tries to bind to the specified port, but also *:8080 (which breaks Landscape’s services). After making those changes, we now run sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure and it redoes its configurations and makes everything adapt to those changes we just made.

2: Solve the web server problem

As I said above, I’m an nginx guy. I also discovered revising the GitLab nginx server to do this is a painful thing, so I did an ingenious thing.

First up: Apache.

I set the Apache bindports to be something else. In this case, I revised /etc/apache2/ports.conf to be the following:

# If you just change the port or add more ports here, you will likely also
# have to change the VirtualHost statement in
# /etc/apache2/sites-enabled/000-default.conf

Listen 10080


Listen 10443


Listen 10443

# vim: syntax=apache ts=4 sw=4 sts=4 sr noet

Now, I went into the sites-enabled configuration for Landscape, and also changed the bindports accordingly – the HTTP listener on Port 80 now listens on 10080, and the SSL listener on Port 443 now listens on 10443 instead.

Second: GitLab.

This one’s easier, since we simply edit /etc/gitlab/gitlab.rb, and modify the following lines:

#nginx['listen_addresses'] = ['127.0.0.1']
#nginx['listen_port'] = 80

First, we uncomment the lines. And then, we change the 'listen_port' item to be whatever we want. I chose 20080. Then sudo gitlab-ctl reconfigure will apply those changes.

Finally, a reverse proxy server to handle everything.

Behold, we introduce a third web server: nginx, 1.8.0, from the NGINX Stable PPA.

This works by default because we already changed all the important bindhosts for services. Now the headache: we have to configure this nginx to do what we want.

Here’s a caveat: I prefer to run things behind HTTPS, with SSL. To do this, and to achieve it with multiple domains, I have a few wildcard certs. You’ll have to modify the configurations that I specify to set them up to use YOUR SSL certs. Otherwise, though, the configurations will be identical.

I prefer to use different site configuration files for each site, so we’ll do that. Also note that you will need to put in real values where I say DOMAIN.TLD and such, same for SSL certs and keys.

First, the catch-all for catching other domains NOT hosted on the server, placed in /etc/nginx/sites-available/catchall:

server {
listen 80 default_server;

server_name _;

return 406; # HTTP 406 is "Not Acceptable". 404 is "Not Found", 410 is "Gone", I chose 406.
}

Second, a snippet file with the configuration to be imported in all the later configs, with reverse proxy configurations and proxy-related settings and headers, put into /etc/nginx/snippets/proxy.settings.snippet:


proxy_redirect off;
proxy_set_header Host $host;
proxy_set_header X-Real-IP $remote_addr;
proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $proxy_add_x_forwarded_for;
proxy_max_temp_file_size 0;

proxy_connect_timeout 90;
proxy_send_timeout 90;
proxy_read_timeout 90;

proxy_buffer_size 4k;
proxy_buffers 4 32k;
proxy_busy_buffers_size 64k;
proxy_temp_file_write_size 64k;

Third, the reverse-proxy configuration for Landscape, which is fairly annoying and took me multiple tries to get working right, placed in /etc/nginx/sites-available/landscape_reverseproxy. Don’t forget that Landscape needs SSL for parts of it, so you can’t skip SSL here:


server {
listen 443 ssl;

server_name landscape.DOMAIN.TLD;

ssl_certificate PATH_TO_SSL_CERTIFICATE; ##### PUT REAL VALUES HERE!
ssl_certificate_key PATH_TO_SSL_CERTIFICATE_KEY; ##### PUT REAL VALUES HERE

# These are courtesy of https://cipherli.st, minus a few things.
ssl_ciphers "EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH";
ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:10m;
ssl_session_tickets off;

include /etc/nginx/snippets/proxy.settings.snippet;

location / {
proxy_pass https://127.0.0.1:10443/;
}

location /message-system {
proxy_pass https://127.0.0.1:10443/;
}
}

server {
listen 80;
server_name landscape.DOMAIN.TLD;

include /etc/nginx/snippets/proxy.settings.snippet;

location / {
return 301 https://landscape.DOMAIN.TLD$request_uri;
}

location /ping {
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:10080/;
}
}

Forth, the reverse-proxy configuration for GitLab, which was not as hard to make working. Remember, I put this behind SSL, so I have SSL configurations here. I’m including comments for what to put if you want to NOT have SSL:

# If you don't want to have the SSL listener, you don't need this first server block
server {
listen 80;
server_name gitlab.DOMAIN.TLD

# We just send all HTTP traffic over to HTTPS here.
return 302 https://gitlab.DOMAIN.TLD$request_uri;
}

server {
listen 443 ssl;
# If you want to have this listen on HTTP instead of HTTPS,
# uncomment the below line, and comment out the other listen line.
#listen 80;
server_name gitlab.DOMAIN.TLD;

# If you're not using HTTPS, remove from here to the line saying
# "Stop SSL Remove" below
ssl_certificate /etc/ssl/hellnet.io/hellnet.io.chained.pem;
ssl_certificate_key /etc/ssl/hellnet.io/hellnet.io.key;

ssl_ciphers "EECDH+AESGCM:EDH+AESGCM:AES256+EECDH:AES256+EDH";
ssl_protocols TLSv1 TLSv1.1 TLSv1.2;
ssl_prefer_server_ciphers on;
ssl_session_cache shared:SSL:10m;
ssl_session_tickets off; # Requires nginx >= 1.5.9
# Stop SSL Remove

include /etc/nginx/snippets/proxy.settings.snippet;

location / {
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:20080/;
}
}

System specifications considerations

Landscape is not light on resources. It takes about a gig of RAM to run safely, from what I’ve observed, but 2GB is more recommended.

GitLab recommends AT LEAST 2GB of RAM. It uses at least that, so you should have 3GB for this at the minimum.

Running both demands just over 3GB of RAM. You can run it on a 4GB box, but it’s better to have double that space just in case, especially if Landscape and Gitlab both get heavy use. I run it on an 8GB converted desktop, which is now a Linux server but used to be a Desktop.